SOLO TRAINING FOR MUAY THAI


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About the Author

Lindsay Bohonik

Lindsay trains in MMA, Muay Thai and jiu jitsu at Kansas City Brazilian Jiu Jitsu and American Top Team KC. She fell in love with the sport and began training after her husband forced her to watch UFC 1-12, bouts from Pride Fighting Championships, and The Ultimate Fighter. You can follow Lindsay on Instagram at instagram.com/lbeatmma.

Everything You Need To Know About Solo Training For Muay Thai

“You can’t wait around for someone else to show up: that’s where you have to make the work happen yourself.

There will come a time when you show up to the gym and realize that you’re all alone. Or perhaps you’re unable to make it to the gym, but you still need to get in some practice time. Whatever the reason, you find yourself without a partner to train with.

My dear Muay Thai friend – it seems the time has come when you must take your training into your own hands!

So what do you do? If you’re like many people, you’ll mess around for a few minutes, maybe tossing some half-assed strikes at the bag. Then you leave. I don’t know about you, but I find that to be a disappointing waste of time.

I’m sure you’ve heard the cliche fitness advice designed to motivate people who struggle to workout. It typically goes something like this:

“Recruit a friend to workout with you in order to have accountability!”

I say bullshit. I’ve heard this advice time and time again. Personally, I find it really irritating. Yes – having a friend to workout with (or specifically in the case of Muay Thai, to train with) is great. But the reality is that you ultimately have to rely on yourself to get things done. When our training partner can’t make it, most of us will inevitably skip the workout or training session at some point. That’s why it’s important to learn how to prepare for those situations so you continue to progress in your training instead of falling backwards.

Sometimes, in order to keep moving forward, you can’t wait around for someone else to show up: that’s where you have to make the work happen yourself.

HEAVY BAG BLUEPRINT 2.0

Add deadly new weapons to your Muay Thai arsenal with Sean Fagan’s HEAVY BAG BLUEPRINT 2.0! Hundreds of drills, combos, techniques & workouts for the heavy bag – with or without a partner! 150+ HD videos, 10+ hours of content, SIX MONTHS OF WORKOUTS!

“Solo Training Where Do I Begin?”

solo beach

Learning how to train solo is a tool that will take your Muay Thai to the next level. The awesome thing about practicing a sport like Muay Thai is that solo practice sessions will help you to continue to progress your skills, technique and conditioning.

So, how do you train solo? There are a number of ways to approach a solo training session:

  • Shadowboxing
  • Bag Work
  • Conditioning
  • Studying Fights & Technique

 

Without interrupting your regular routine in cases where your partners or coaches aren’t around to work with you, here’s how to incorporate solo training into your routine.

RECOMMENDED READING

Solo training, like anything, is a skill to be learned. Learn about the basics of solo training from the perspective of a fellow nak muay.

#1: HAVE A ROCK-SOLID PLAN

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Being successful at Muay Thai, as well as maintaining your overall health and fitness goals fundamentally starts with organization.

There’s something about putting pen to paper that makes things more real. Outlining your training plan can help you to keep focus and stay committed to your goals.

Consider having:

  • PLAN A. Your general routine that you do on a daily and weekly basis. Includes regular classes, pad work sessions, bag work, and solo training.
  • PLAN B. This is your back-up plan. When Plan A is a no-go for whatever reason, you use Plan B.

 

The most successful Muay Thai practitioners are not just committed – they’re fluid with their training. They reassess and adjust as needed to meet their goals. This allows them to be consistent even when they have to overcome obstacles in order to train.

RECOMMENDED READING

This one’s not for novice nak muay, but it can work for an intermediate solo training session! It’s intense, though – so fighter, beware!

Here are the tools I use to help me organize my training:

  • GOOGLE CALENDAR. For whatever reasons, I’ve never been good at keeping a paper calendar. In my Google calendar, I input every training session planned for the week and often set it as a recurring appointment so it’s always there.
  • EXCEL or GOOGLE SHEETS. I like to keep track of how many training sessions I do each month. It’s pretty nerdy, but it’s extremely satisfying to look back and see how much work I put in each month. (It’s also how I track my weight.)
  • PAPER NOTEBOOK. I carry around a notebook in my gym bag to write down drills from class. I also keep a printed copy of The Heavy Bag Blueprint 2.0, blank pieces of paper, tape, and a sharpie in my locker. When it comes time for bag work, I pick a workout (or select one I already have) and tape it up on the wall to reference while I’m practicing.

 

Planning your training with what you’re going to do will really help to focus and streamline your sessions.

#2: LEARN TO SHADOWBOX

shadowboxing

When I first started training, I was, to say the least, not a huge fan of shadowboxing. It felt silly and uncomfortable. I didn’t know what to do, plus I felt like everyone was watching me.

Thankfully, shadowboxing becomes easier the more you do it. Most beneficially to your wallet, shadowboxing might also be the most cost-effective, minimalist way of training. It requires zero equipment, not a lot of space and is, obviously, extremely portable.

Find something to focus on during shadowboxing, like angles, footwork or head movement will make shadowboxing easier. It’s also a great time to visualize your opponent. When in doubt, you can always run through drills during shadowboxing.

RECOMMENDED READING

This one’s not for novice nak muay, but it can work for an intermediate solo training session! It’s intense, though – so fighter, beware!

#3: HIT THE BAG

tracking nutrition

The heavy bag is your best friend when it comes to solo training. Of the many benefits of using a heavy bag, traditional favorites include:

  • It’s never late.
  • It won’t talk back to you.
  • Unlike a person, it’s always there for you when you need it.
  • You can beat the crap out of it and never have to say sorry!

 

Using the heavy bag will help with your technique, speed, power, and conditioning. It’s a fantastic piece of equipment that I think is highly underutilized.

So if the heavy bag is so awesomely useful, why don’t you see people using the heavy bag more often?

It’s simple: they don’t know what to do.

RECOMMENDED READING

Avoid the usual slip-ups when first introducing your eight limbs to the heavy bag. Learn how to revolutionize and overhaul your heavy bag sessions.

The heavy bag is a bit like approaching a pretty girl or handsome guy at the bar: you really want to talk to them, but you’re just not sure what to do once you get over there. You can get learn how to approach the heavy bag with confidence when you have a plan of how you’ll attack your workout.

Incorporating regular heavy bag work is not just useful as a solo training tool, but it’ll also enhance your entire game as a whole. Unlike in drilling and sparring, you can rip on a bag as hard as you like. When I’m doing a heavy bag session, I like to focus on at least one of these areas:

  • Technique (always!)
  • Fundamentals – basic striking and basic combos
  • Power
  • Speed (coupled with precision)
  • Footwork
  • Conditioning (expanding your gas tank)

 

With your focus in mind, you can utilize the heavy bag for combos, drills and workouts. Although I can come up with workouts on the fly, I prefer not to. The same goes for a heavy bag workout. This is when I bust out my Heavy Bag Blueprint 2.0 to get me the most effective bag workout that I can.

FREE MUAY THAI MINI CLASS!

WARNING:
This mini class will make you a dominant force in the ring. It may cause BOOSTED MOTIVATION, OPTIMIZED TRAINING & SHARPENED STRIKING. Not for the casual nak muay! Proceed with caution!

STRENGTH & CONDITIONING

strength and conditioning

Solo training is a great opportunity to improve your conditioning. There are bodyweight-based workouts, weight training, heavy bag workouts, yoga, cardio, sprinting, etc.

There are literally hundreds of different ways to workout. Use the ones that you enjoy most.

RECOMMENDED READING

This intense seven-minute ab workout forges a reinforced core that is ready and able to absorb punishment and endure a brutal fight. Don’t skip this one! For advanced nak muay only!

WATCH & LEARN

Taping yourself training is not just great content for your social media. It’s also a useful way of monitoring your progress. It provides you visual feedback that you can use to improve your technique.

Plus, once the camera is rolling, I naturally strive to perform better. I don’t want to look back at tape later and see poor technique!

Additionally, it’s something you can reference months down the road to see the progress you have made. It’s one of my favorite ways to monitor progress and improvement.

RECOMMENDED READING

A monster outline of how best to train and teach yourself! “…training in any environment, with minimal equipment, no partners and only your body.”

STUDY TECHNIQUE & FIGHTS

saenchai

This is the obviously the least physically demanding of the methods available to you in solo training, but that doesn’t mean it’s useless!

When you’re in the gym, that’s the time to work on your technique, conditioning, movement, and so forth. Studying technique or watching fights is a great way to further add to your Muay Thai repertoire.

For instance, when I am doing a Heavy Bag Blueprint 2.0 workout, I watch the videos before I go to the gym so I’m not wasting any time. I would do the same if I were doing an exercise I was unfamiliar with.

FREE MUAY THAI MINI CLASS!

This mini class will make you a dominant force in the ring. It may cause BOOSTED MOTIVATION, OPTIMIZED TRAINING & SHARPENED STRIKING. Not for the casual nak muay! Proceed with caution!

Solo Training For Muay Thai… & You

solo training

Whether you’re a recreational Muay Thai practitioner or you’re preparing for a fight, solo training is a crucial addition to your training regime. The Heavy Bag Blueprint 2.0 gives you the autonomy to adapt your training to fit your unique needs, schedule, goals and etc, without the stress of having to create workouts from scratch. With this program, you’re provided with a framework on how to best incorporate solo training.

So, if you find yourself needing to come up with a replacement plan for your normal workout, or if you’re looking to increase the tools in your arsenal, solo training is an essential to improving your Muay Thai game.

HEAVY BAG BLUEPRINT 2.0

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Sean “Muay Thai Guy” Fagan’s HEAVY BAG BLUEPRINT 2.0 is THE premier source of training & fighting wisdom for ALL nak muays. Click now to LEVEL UP YOUR MUAY THAI!

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